The Anointing of the Sick is a sacrament of healing.  At St. Raymond, for individual anointing contact the Parish Office to schedule.

Among the seven sacraments there is one especially intended to strengthen those who are being tried by illness, the Anointing of the Sick.

“Heal the sick!” The Church has received this charge from the Lord and strives to carry it out by taking care of the sick as well as by accompanying them with her prayer of intercession. She believes in the life-giving presence of Christ, the physician of souls and bodies. This presence is particularly active through the sacraments, and in an altogether special way through the Eucharist, the bread that gives eternal life and that St. Paul suggests is connected with bodily health.

Who Receives the Sacrament of the Sick?

  • Anyone who is seriously ill can be anointed, including the elderly who become weak, even if no illness is present
  • Those waiting for surgery or about to go into the hospital for tests
  • Sick children who have sufficient use of reason
  • Those who are unconcious or who have lost the use of reason
  • The mentally ill, provided they will be helped and not harmed by the rite
  • those who are in need of spiritual healing

In case of grave illness . . .

The Anointing of the Sick “is not a sacrament for those only who are at the point of death. Hence, as soon as anyone of the faithful begins to be in danger of death from sickness or old age, the fitting time for him to receive this sacrament has certainly already arrived.”

If a sick person who received this anointing recovers his health, he can in the case of another grave illness receive this sacrament again. If during the same illness the person’s condition becomes more serious, the sacrament may be repeated. It is fitting to receive the Anointing of the Sick just prior to a serious operation. The same holds for the elderly whose frailty becomes more pronounced.”

How is the Sacrament of the Sick Celebrated?

“Like all the sacraments the Anointing of the Sick is a liturgical and communal celebration, whether it takes place in the family home, a hospital or church, for a single sick person or a whole group of sick persons. It is very fitting to celebrate it within the Eucharist, the memorial of the Lord’s Passover. If circumstances suggest it, the celebration of the sacrament can be preceded by the sacrament of Penance and followed by the sacrament of the Eucharist. As the sacrament of Christ’s Passover the Eucharist should always be the last sacrament of the earthly journey, the “viaticum” for “passing over” to eternal life. “

Source: Catechism of the Catholic Church